Kyriarchy


(If you haven’t seen my new blog introduction, read that here).

My new tagline is “Stomping the kyriarchy with ordinary words.” It took me a lot of effort to come up with that. I despise packaging myself into a marketable object, but I also wanted to communicate my new goal. Since “kyriarchy” is not a term you’ll see around very often (that should change!), I thought I would give a summary of its definition, and explain my tagline.

If you’ve known me for a while, you know that “patriarchy” is a word I’ve used quite often. It generally refers to the lordship, or domination, over women by men. Historically, it was meant to denote whence the family line would proceed, who would be the heir, who rules the family, and I think you get the picture already. Patriarchy is only one form of domination among many, though; for example, classism, colonialism, homophobia, and racism, to name just a few, are also forms of domination.

Last year, I became aware of the term kyriarchy, as introduced by Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza. She uses the term to describe the intersection of all forms of domination, i.e., “lordship” (kyrios is Greek for “lord” or “master”). I am not sure exactly where I saw the term initially, but after reading Zac’s Twitter thread on it, I was convinced that my unofficial mission to upset the patriarchy wasn’t broad enough. Even though I am convicted of justice for all, am freshly attuned to the evidence and effects of colonialism and racism (particularly because of some familial heritage), and dwell in a mixed orientation marriage, my focus wasn’t intersectional. True feminism seeks the liberation of all who are oppressed, not just women. The gospel speaks to the liberation of all who are oppressed, not just a select few. Therefore, it is my unofficial mission to stomp the kyriarchy.

“…with ordinary words” speaks to the tone of my blog, and most of its content. While I am my happiest when studying and learning, I have not been in the academic environment for a long time. I’m not likely to write anything that’s highly academic here (if I do, I will explain). I hope that most of what I write will be approachable. “Ordinary words” also refers to the rhythms of everyday life, some of which I might record for you all with words. I am not a full-fledged activist, but it is my hope and intention to uproot kyriarchy in the everyday, within myself, and the environment around me.

Join me in stomping the kyriarchy?